Brisbane Fans: Break a sweat in the Fitcamp Four Week Challenge

Got more junk in your trunk than you’d like? Tackle those trouble zones and ramp up your fitness for the sunny season with the Fitcamp Four Week Challenge, where you can attend two free classes a week for four weeks. Win! Just show up in your favourite workout gear with a towel and some water and get to work on those buns of steel.

What: Fitcamp 4 Week Challenge

Where: Gregory Park, Baroona Road, Milton, Australia

Dates:

* Tuesday October 8 and Thursday October 10 (6am – 7am)

To Reserve your place or for more info: Call Lang Park PCYC 3369 2647

By Ashleigh Perriott

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COME AND VISIT ME DOWN AT THE HEALTH & WELLBEING WEEKEND TOMORROW!

Slip on those comfy Nike Free’s and head down to the much-anticipated 2013 Health and Wellbeing Weekend at the Chinese Garden Forecourt, Darling Harbour. Running this weekend, the Health & Wellbeing event will be filled with plenty of exercise workshops, cooking demonstrations, pampering areas, holistic living and fascinating seminars by industry experts. You might even catch my 30 minute Q+A with Women’s Fitness Editor, Lucy Cousins about how I stay healthy and fit and tips on how to start a successful health and fitness blog. So clear your mind and come join us for a fun and active weekend starting tomorrow! Visit the Health & Wellbeing website for more info and session times. Look forward to seeing you all there XX

GOOD NEWS FOR PEANUT BUTTER FANS!

There’s good news for peanut butter fans. Researchers tracked 9000 women from 1996-2010 and found that those who ate peanut butter or nuts twice a week or more when aged 9 to 15 were 39 per cent less likely to have developed benign breast disease – while non-cancerous it increases your risk of developing breast cancer later – than those who skipped the nuts. So thank your mum for dishing up peanut butter toast or slipping a peanut butter sandwich in your school lunchbox.  Cheers Mum.

Results also showed some evidence that noshing on beans, lentils, soybeans and corn may also prevent the growth of the disease.